Why Do We Condemn Being Mediocre?

Why Do We Condemn Being Mediocre?

Why Do We Condemn Being Mediocre? has been edited by Pratichi Sadavrati.


“You, sir, are Mediocre!” Insulted, is that how you are feeling? Why? Is it because I told you that you were average or because it shattered your personal belief? I do not wish to offend, no, but you might have to bear with being mediocre.

But, it is acceptable, to wish to be the phenomenal one. Everyone wants to stand out. Ever wondered why? Since our childhood, the world has pushed us towards achieving unrealistic goals, forced us in believing “survival of the fittest”. It is only after you have climbed to the top, you can have the luxury of happiness. Is this how it works? Look around, everyone is living happily, maybe the guy sleeping on the roadside is happier.

At a very young age, we take the burden of excelling in each and every aspect. Receiving a gift or a compliment is all the validation we needed while growing up but at the later stage, accomplishment became a basic instinct. We led ourselves into believing that the only way to live a satisfactory life is by being at the very top.

Initially, this belief had led us to become better versions of ourselves, but gradually it started implanting insecurities in us. We started fearing failures. Why? Because of the belief that crept inside us, the belief that the society would never accept them! And we never learned to encounter and overcome them. The thought of the world disapproving us, haunted us so much that we started pushing ourselves to the maximum possible extent, to be competent, to be the best. But never did we learn to be complacent.

Also, as we started giving our best to everything on our plate, it became impossible for us to accept that it was not worthy enough, it was not good enough. And that is why it was painful when someone referred us as mediocre, that our work was ordinary. That we were ordinary. It shattered all the strength we had been building up since childhood. But deep down we knew, we were not the best, we knew we had to struggle a lot, but we just did not want to listen. We just did not want to accept that.

What every person in this world probably hates, is incompetence. And somehow that we have already made “being the best”, our goal, something very onerous, it has led us to build this ego. An ego, which does not let ourselves believe that we are any less. Wishing and aiming to be the best is not wrong, it is completely justifiable. But simultaneously, it is imperative to learn to accept where we stand. Only after that, we can reach where we want to.

Also, a lot of people possess the potential to be at the top, but somehow they are not. The majority of them, fall prey to the hands of laziness and procrastination and eventually end up being where they do not deserve to be, making it harder for them to achieve their goals, making it almost impossible to accept the slow but sure process of being better.

The problem with most of us is that we exactly know what we want. We also know the means and the struggle we have to go through to make it possible. We just do not want to put a little extra effort and rather cry over the spilt milk.

My purpose is not to offend you in any way, it is just that, it makes me feel uneasy when someone with potential is not where they could have been. It makes me sad when after everything, we fail to accept the failures and never learn to pick ourselves up. It kind of pinches me when someone takes being mediocre as an insult. If we are not ready to accept who we are, how can we be eligible to be who we want to?

Personally, I think one must take being mediocre as a compliment. I feel it works as a mirror, which enables you not only to introspect but also picture what all you have achieved and how far you are from your goal.


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Parth Bhatt

Parth Bhatt - Capricious | Samaritan | Anti-Photogenic | Selective Procrastinator | Occasional Psychic | Especially Gifted Napper | Spreading Smiles since ’96.